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Direct Instruction

2018-2019 SCHOOL YEAR - NEW Contract Option

  • 25 High School Courses Across all 4 Core Content Areas
  • 18 Electives Including Spanish I-III
  • Taught by ESC Content Experts
Click on the tabs to the right for a more detailed look at each Direct Instruction course.

Elar Course Descriptions

English III- “Extra, extra, read all about it!” It’s all right here in black and white, in the pages of The Virtual Times newspaper. Published at key periods in our American history, The Virtual Times takes us right into the action. The writing is clear and concise. The stories and opinions give us perspective. The sports and entertainment sections give us the color and flavor of the times. In English III, the writing and insights of authors throughout our history are collected in the fast-paced pages of The Virtual Times. You’ll gain an appreciation of American literature and the ways it reflects the times in which it was written. You’ll discover how people thought and lived and wrote about their experiences. You’ll also be asked to observe, investigate and report on stories of today. The goal is to be thorough, accurate and compelling in your writing. Perhaps in times to come, people will want to read what you thought and wrote.

Pre-Requisites: Recommended: English I & II

Credits: 1.0


English IV- Come explore the world of big ideas in English IV, where you are able to choose which path you will travel first as you explore highly-engaging, thematic units. Each path will guide you through a series of literary pieces that allow you to analyze the political, social, economic, and cultural messages of its time as well as its relevance to the world you live in today. Each path revolves around a central theme. The works in the course span a period of over 1000 years and have been written by authors who share common ideas, but employ a variety of literary genres to express their views. Whether it is the dramatic ending of a play, or the colorful images in a verse of poetry, the words of these authors will leave you with a new understanding of the world around you. As you travel down each path, you will create authentic work pieces that will engage you in higher-level learning and provide you with a greater understanding of literature and its connection to the world.

Pre-Requisites: English I, II, and III are recommended

Credits: 1.0



Electives Course Descriptions

Astronomy- Why do stars twinkle? Is it possible to fall into a black hole? Will the sun ever stop shining? Since the first glimpse of the night sky, humans have been fascinated with the stars, planets, and universe that surrounds us. This course will introduce students to the study of astronomy, including its history and development, basic scientific laws of motion and gravity, the concepts of modern astronomy, and the methods used by astronomers to learn more about the universe. Additional topics include the solar system, the Milky Way and other galaxies, and the sun and stars. Using online tools, students will examine the life cycle of stars, the properties of planets, and the exploration of space.

Pre-Requisites:

Credits: 0.5


Creative Writing- For many hundreds of years, literature has been one of the most important human art forms. It allows us to give voice to our emotions, create imaginary worlds, express ideas, and escape the confines of material reality. Through creative writing, we can come to understand ourselves and our world a little bit better. This course provides students with a solid grounding in the writing process, from finding inspiration to building a basic story to using complicated literary techniques and creating strange hybrid forms of poetic prose and prose poetry. By the end of this course, students will learn how to discover their creative thoughts and turn those ideas into fully realized pieces of creative writing.

Pre-Requisites:

Credits: 0.5


 

Psychology I- Understanding the thoughts, emotions and behaviors of self and others is critical to developing and maintaining interpersonal relationships. In Psychology I, students learn theories of historically significant psychologists who laid the foundation for scientific research and a clearer understanding of the human mind. This course explores how psychological perspectives influence personality and play a role in human development across the lifespan. Students examine how behaviors are developed, memories are stored and language is acquired. Students also learn about the symptoms and classifications of psychological disorders, along with the various forms of treatments available. After completing this course, students will be equipped with problem solving strategies and even learn methods to cope with stress. Practical, everyday application of the content is a focus of this course.

Pre-Requisites: None

Credits: 0.5


Public Speaking- The art of public speaking is one which underpins the very foundations of Western society. This course examines those foundations in both Aristotle and Cicero’s views of rhetoric, and then traces those foundations into the modern world. Students will learn not just the theory, but also the practice of effective public speaking, including how to analyze the speeches of others, build a strong argument, and speak with confidence and flair. By the end of this course, students will know exactly what makes a truly successful speech and will be able to put that knowledge to practical use.

Pre-Requisites:

Credits: 0.5

Reading for College Success- How will reading affect a student’s future? How does reading shape the world around us? This course helps students answer these questions and prepare for college and career success. Reading is a vital skill in the information age, when we are bombarded with a constant stream of information. Being able to determine and comprehend the main ideas in this constant flow is imperative to success both in the academic world and in the world of work. Learning to discern fact from opinion and bias from objectivity will empower students to make better life and work decisions, while effective note taking and summarizing skills help students achieve their goals in higher education and in the career of their choosing.

Pre-Requisites:

Credits: 0.5


Mathematics Course Descriptions

Algebra II- This course allows students to learn while having fun. Interactive examples help guide students’ journey through customized feedback and praise. Mathematical concepts are applied to everyday occurrences such as earthquakes, stadium seating, and purchasing movie tickets. Students investigate the effects of an equation on its graph through the use of technology. Students have opportunities to work with their peers on specific lessons. Algebra II is an advanced course using hands-on activities, applications, group interactions, and the latest technology.

Pre-Requisites: Algebra 1

Credits: 1.0


Geometry-Geometry is everywhere, not just in pyramids. Engineers use geometry to build highways and bridges. Artists use geometry to create perspective in their paintings, and mapmakers help travelers find things using the points located on a geometric grid. Throughout this course, students travel a mathematical highway illuminated by spatial relationships, reasoning, connections, and problem solving.

Pre-Requisites: Algebra I

Credits: 1.0


Pre-Calculus- Students, as mathematical analysts, will investigate how advanced mathematics concepts can solve problems encountered in operating national parks. The purpose of this course is to study functions and develop skills necessary for the study of calculus. The Pre-calculus course includes analytical geometry and trigonometry. Pre-calculus is an Honors level course.

Pre-Requisites: Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry

Credits: 1.0


Science Course Descriptions

Chemistry- Chemistry I and Chemistry I Honors are rigorous and not intended for credit recovery. This course contains several laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures that are an integral part of the learning experience. This course is designed as an interactive, 21st century course. Topics include the composition, properties, and changes associated with matter and their applications. This course serves as a foundation for the study of Chemistry. The utilization of scientific inquiry, interactive experiences, higher order thinking, collaborative projects, real world application all aid the student in ultimately demonstrating a vast understanding of the importance of Chemistry in the world around them; enabling them to apply these properties to their everyday lives.

Pre-Requisites: Algebra I

Credits: 1.0


Physics- In each module of Physics I, students discover the contributions of scientific geniuses like Galileo, Newton, and Einstein. Through their work, students learn the concepts, theories, and laws that govern the interaction of matter, energy, and forces. From tiny atoms to galaxies with millions of stars, the universal laws of physics are explained through real-world examples. Using laboratory activities, simulations, images, and interactive elements, students follow in the footsteps of some of the world’s greatest thinkers.

Pre-Requisites: Algebra I & II recommended

Credits: 1.0



Social Studies Course Descriptions

US Government- Responsible citizenship, including civil and political participation is essential to maintain a representative government that truly represents the people of the United States. In this course, students learn about the structure of government and how it shares power at the local, state and federal levels. This course also explores founding principles that inspired the Constitution and Bill of Rights, preserving the freedoms that students experience daily. Students will examine the processes of each branch of government, the election process, and how citizens can impact public policy. The media, interest groups and influential citizens provide examples of how the government can be affected by informed and active participants. Students will examine the U.S. Court system, and become a part of the process by participating in the judicial decision making process. They will also discover ways the United States interacts with countries around the world, through domestic policy, foreign policy and human rights policy.

Pre-Requisites: 11th or 12th grade status and English I & II recommended

Credits: 0.5



World History- In Segment I, students will learn how the Roman Empire developed in two very distinct directions. Next, students will discover the great intellectual and cultural contributions of Islamic Empires. Journey through the Middle Ages of Europe and Japan to learn how knights and samurais lived. Students will also investigate the rise and fall of some of the great kingdoms of the Americas and Africa and then travel back to the Europe of the Renaissance and Reformation era. Segment II begins with a bang as students will learn about advancements in science and thought during the Age of Enlightenment and the social and political revolutions that followed as a result. As students meander through the 19th century, they will learn about the transformation from an agricultural to an industrial world and the many changes that resulted from that shift. Students will then learn about the interconnectedness of nationalism and colonialism and the two massive world wars were the end result. As students approach the finish line, they will learn about development in our modern world and the implications that historical events have on us today.

Pre-Requisites: None

Credits: 1.0



World Languages Course Descriptions

Spanish I- ¡Bienvenidos! Welcome! Students are taking a virtual trip to Spain, Cuba, Colombia, and Argentina. As students explore each country, a student blogger is there to help them learn about the place and its unique characteristics. As students travel to each country, they learn how to speak Spanish in many practical and useful ways. Students learn how to greet people, introduce themselves, and speak about their home, family, school, and community. As students learn basic vocabulary and grammar skills, they expand on their knowledge and learn to speak about more complex topics such as shopping, weather, sports, entertainment, and leisure activities. The course introduces new words and phrases with pictures, audio clips, and examples. Students learn basic Spanish grammar to help them build fluency and understand the structure of the Spanish language. There are many opportunities to practice through interactive activities in the form of games, written practice, and listening and speaking exercises. Students also explore the cultures of Spain, Cuba, Colombia, and Argentina by learning about geography, foods, celebrations, and traditions from each place. Student bloggers guide students through these countries and help them appreciate and learn about their diversity.

Pre-Requisites:

Credits: 1.0


Spanish II- In Spanish II, students travel virtually through Central America and the Caribbean, spending time in museums, traffic jams, and even the hospital. In this course, students broaden their Spanish vocabulary and their knowledge of grammar. They meet people from many different countries and cultures. While waiting for the plane ride home, students also meet some Spanish-speaking people from different parts of the United States. The purpose of this course is to strengthen Spanish listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students also experience the beauty and expressiveness of a language that is shared by different people and cultures throughout the world.

Pre-Requisites: Spanish I

Credits: 1.0


Spanish III- Dive into the rich diversity of Hispanic culture across the globe by exploring the tastes, sights, and sounds of this dynamic language that reflects triumph, struggle, celebration, and so much more. During this cultural journey, you’ll improve conversational, vocabulary, and writing skills through authentic tasks. Short of obtaining a passport, there is no better way to discover new lands, peoples, or experiences. Take your Spanish language abilities to the next level!

Pre-Requisites: Spanish I and Spanish II

Credits: 1.0


What is Direct Instruction?
  • Blended Learning
  • Webinars
  • Online courses
  • On-site visits
  • Direct contact with ESC content experts
  • Student progress monitoring & reporting
  • Student-Parent-Teacher-Administrator
    communication through Canvas Learning
    Management System™
For More Information Contact

René Cano

rene.cano@esc16.net

806-677-5177

or

Kaci Sudbrink

kaci.sudbrink@esc16.net

806-677-5180

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